Figures released by The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) show that of the 83,224 drivers during the month long campaign in June, 4,857 (5.8%) tested positive, refused or failed a breath test. Although this is slight improvement on last year when 6% of those tested failed a breath test, it is not the significant drop that police officers want to see.

Additionally, there has been a small fall in the number of under 25's found drink driving. This is good news as there had been an increase in the number of young offenders since 2010. However, there are still more under 25's drink driving than over 25's: 6.7% compared with 5.5%. Drivers under 25 make up just 6 million of the almost 45 million drivers in the UK.

ACPO lead on Roads Policing, Deputy Chief Constable Suzette Davenport said, "Although there has been a reduction in 2012, this reduction is not big enough. There were still almost 5,000 drivers found to be driving under the influence who have not got the message.

"Through our annual Christmas and summer campaigns we have consistently warned the public that drink and drug driving can kill. It can also lead to a lengthy driving ban and possible loss of jobs and livelihoods with some even facing imprisonment.

"We are disappointed that there is still a group of people who are not listening or ignoring the consequences and continuing to drink or take drugs and drive.

"The police will continue to work with communities to reach this group of drivers."

Police used Field Impairment Tests to check for drivers under the influence of drugs and of those stopped on suspicion of drug driving, 22% were arrested. Police officers are looking out for signs of drivers under the influence and they will target them with both breath tests and field impairment tests to make arrests of people who should not be on the road.

Drinking or taking drugs and driving clearly increases the risk of being involved in a collision as 8.7% of people tested after a collision were found to be under influence compared with 5.2% for routine tests.

DCC Suzette Davenport continued, "We know that drink and drugs impair judgement, reduce concentration and delay reaction speed and this is clearly leading to collisions that put people's lives at risk.

"Our message is clear and simple: if you planning to go out and drink, make arrangements to avoid driving, whether that is using public transport, taking a taxi or nominating a driver who will not drink. Taking the risk is just not worth it."

Road Safety Minister Mike Penning added:

"I welcome the news that the number of under 25s drink driving has fallen, however it's clear that there's still a lot to do.

"Drink and drug driving are both serious offences. Drivers should be in no doubt - if they are caught behind the wheel under the influence they risk losing their licence as well as facing a fine and a prison sentence.

"We are making it easier for the police to tackle drug driving by introducing new legislation that will create a specific drug driving offence to test for the presence of drugs in drivers. Britain's roads are among the safest in the world but we are not complacent and I am determined to crack down on those who continue to put lives at risk."

ENDS

NOTES FOR EDITORS:

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) figure from June 2012 show that there are 44, 784, 122 licensed drivers in the UK and 5, 755, 223 UK drivers are under 25- http://www.dft.gov.uk/dvla/ .

The ACPO Press Office can be contacted via 020 7084 8946/47/48 (office hours) or via 07803 903686 (out of office hours).

The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) is an independent, professionally led strategic body. In the public interest and, in equal and active partnership with Government and the Association of Police Authorities, ACPO leads and co-ordinates the direction and development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In times of national need ACPO, on behalf of all chief officers, co-ordinates the strategic policing response.

ACPO's 329 members consist of 242 chief police officers from the home forces of assistant chief constable rank (commanders in the Metropolitan Police and City of London Police) and above, plus 66 senior police staff members from the 44 forces in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Non home forces such as British Transport Police have 21 chief police officer members and there are three members from the Service Police.

NATIONAL TOTAL

2011

2012

% CHANGE

Total breath tests administered NOT involving collisions

71556

68109

-4.82

Total of those that were positive, refused or failed

3878

3540

-8.72

% of total tested that were positive, failed or refused

5.42

5.20

-4.10

Total breath tests administered FOLLOWING collisions

16515

15115

-8.48

Total of those that were positive, refused or failed

1418

1317

-7.12

% of total tested that were positive, failed or refused

8.59

8.71

1.48

Total number of collisions recorded

25315

21057

-16.82

Total number of breath tests administered to UNDER 25s

21398

19714

-7.87

Total of those that were positive, refused or failed

1579

1327

-15.96

% of total tested that were positive, failed or refused

7.38

6.73

-8.78

Total number of breath tests administered to 25 YEARS AND OVER

64889

61406

-5.37

Total of those that were positive, refused or failed

3643

3388

-7.00

% of total tested that were positive, failed or refused

5.61

5.52

-1.72

Total number of FIELD IMPAIRMENT TESTS conducted

328

284

-13.41

Total of those that resulted in a Section 4 arrest

121

63

-47.93

% of total tested that resulted in a Section 4 arrest

36.89

22.18

-39.87

Total number of Sec 4 Arrests NOT following a FIT test

448

432

-3.57

Total number of Sec 4 arrests following a collision

70

116

65.71

Total Breath Tests

88071

83224

-5.50

Total PFR

5296

4857

-8.29

% PFR

6.01

5.84

-2.95

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